An uber-self-aware Star Trek parody gives way to a kind and heartwarming time-travel story

An uber-self-aware Star Trek parody gives way to a kind and heartwarming time-travel story. Scalzi has aimed this at being a meta-mashup that maintains gentle good taste and regularly pulls knowing chuckles out of the reader–until, near the cleverly structured ending, they are replaced with smiles and maybe some misty-eyed appreciation of the poignancy. Despite some redundancy, (particularly noticeable during the first two parts of the triple coda) it succeeds–just enough to hang onto its fifth star, in my opinion. BTW, nouveau writers: note how few details of characters’ appearance ar…
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He told the widow of a fallen soldier ‘he knew what he signed up for’ during his call meant to offer condolences

He told the widow of a fallen soldier ‘he knew what he signed up for’ during his call meant to offer condolences. How fucked up do you have to be. He used his wealth to dodge the draft, ran for president pretending to care about troops, made fun of POWs, lied that his predecessors never called families and now this? And he says taking a knee disrespects troops? There is no bottom with this guy.

Only a few hours left! Heres the video that i made for the #audible20 anniversary contest to win a car (and the next vid is my plea for you to vote;…

Only a few hours left! Heres the video that i made for the #audible20 anniversary contest to win a car (and the next vid is my plea for you to vote; a pic of how to find it via google; and my odometer as of last week). Click on the link in my bio to go directly to my video where you can vote. All you have to do is click “vote”, thats it! One vote per person. Voting ends TONIGHT, friday october 13th at 11:59pm PST. Pleeeeeease vote for my video! Thank you!! #audible #audible20 #iloveaudible #vote #ilovemycarbutineedanewone #audiobooklover #audiobooks #videoart #win #justoneclick #feminist #professionalonthego

Sharing one last time (its nearly 2am where i am

Sharing one last time (its nearly 2am where i am…im goin to bed)- but for those in the states, you have until 11:59 pst tonight to vote for my video and help me win a car in the audible 20th anniversary video contest! All it takes is a simple little click! Please vote if you havent already! 1 vote per person. Thank you!!!

I don’t keep a cupboard filled of dress-up clothes I like to binge-drink in, pretending I’m having a party with my friends

I don’t keep a cupboard filled of dress-up clothes I like to binge-drink in, pretending I’m having a party with my friends. If you want to dress up, you literally can do so anytime.
You don’t need a club to dance to the movement of breath, the breeze of the world.
You don’t need drugs to see colors, hear trees, or feel the energy vibrating off every living thing. You really don’t. But please, judge me, because I’m not as free as your last Burning Man experience, on acid.
“We’re too different.” An indigestible rejection excuse, and no, while I thought they might be, they’re one of the same. And difference terrifies sameness. Sheep to my wolf…

#metoo

#metoo. These two simple words – and the millions of posts about sexual assault and harassment that fill up our timelines today – are both heartbreaking and courageous. I stand with the women – and men – who are posting today.
It’s not easy to speak out. I know that so many women in the workforce – and for me, especially in the early years – deal with unwanted advances and harassment the best we can. Sometimes we speak up to the person directly. Sometimes we tell our boss. Sometimes we’re too afraid to say anything at all and just cry to a friend. But always, we know that at its core this is about power no one should have over anyone.
I am proud to join so many people kicking this elephant out of the room today.

#UsToo, The countless #metoo posts we’re seeing from friends and family about harassment abuse and rape more often than not are the product of men…

#UsToo
The countless #metoo posts we’re seeing from friends and family about harassment abuse and rape more often than not are the product of men we know who are friends and family as well as ourselves. As well as myself.
I spent yesterday reading and trying to absorb what I was witnessing. I’ve long known that harassment and assault were a huge problem for women, but as a man, knowing the numbers never quite impresses upon you the magnitude of the problem and the profound human cost that comes with it. I didn’t really comment or respond to what I saw yesterday because I wasn’t sure how. I felt like yesterday needed to be about the women speaking and I didn’t want to take any attention away from that.
A lot of the conversation about assaults on women, be they verbal or physical, are written in the passive voice. She was harassed. She was groped. She was raped. In the active voice these incidents read as ‘we harassed her. We groped her and we raped her.’ It was one of us who did each and every one of these things.
Before the cliché declarations of sympathy and pledges to stand up to people. Before all the statements promising to be more chivalrous gallant and frankly more conventionally ‘masculine’ towards the perpetrators, we need to do something else. We need to think long and hard about our active, not passive, role in this. To what extent are each of us the perpetrators?
I’m not saying we’re all rapists. That doesn’t mean you, and I, haven’t contributed in some direct way at times to the incredible sexually hostile environment women navigate daily.
So think first about what have you done to women. Have you walked into a meeting called on professional pretenses with the hope that it would turn into a date or lead to one? Have you been flirtatious with women seeking mentorship making their ability to speak to you and benefit from your experience predicated on them humoring your sexual suggestions; something men in our work virtually never have to deal with? Have you touched women in ways that you thought could be defensively characterized as friendly but still hoped might send a more than friendly message?
Imagine if every time you sought to meet with a peer for advice or mentorship you had to steel yourself for the possibility of facing unwanted sexual advances? How would that affect your career and your ability to advance? How would it affect your sense of safety?
These aggressions form the landscape of daily assaults that at times escalate into the more manifest violence we’re reading about. The ubiquitous nature of these behaviors cause women to reasonably doubt that when even more forceful violations of their bodies and sense of security take place that no man will be there to understand them or support them.
Without raping anyone, engaging in these behaviors reinforce and protect rape culture and in turn rapists themselves.
So let’s engage in the very painful audit of our own transgressions and how we can be better in the active sense before we talk about how we will stop other bad guys. We’re a part of the problem and we have to reckon with that. However painful it may be for us, it has been far more painful and torturous for our victims. The least we can do is respond to their incredible courage yesterday and every day and have the strength to be self-critical in truly harsh ways.
Beyond physical actions we need to check how we speak about women. Not only towards them but also in private. Using a language of objectification helps pave the way for a practice of objectification. Moreover, such language signals to other men around us that perceiving women as objects is OK. It suggests that it’s normal.
Finally, there needs to be accountability. People need to go to jail. Police, prosecutors and judges need to be trained to understand what harassment is and how to take it seriously. We also need women to be better represented in these positions. Ultimately, a lack of accountability allows people to continue pursuing these behaviors. We see this with Weinstein when everyone from colleagues to police to prosecutors protected him. Without consequences, these behaviors won’t end. This can’t be reduced to men behaving better. This is also about men ceasing to engage in criminal behavior and when they do, facing serious legal consequences for doing so.

Richard Wilbur introduced me to Molière with his translation of Tartuffe

Richard Wilbur introduced me to Molière with his translation of Tartuffe. Only in his passing am I now becoming familiar with the scope is his literary achievements, through obituaries like this one. He lived a long life, and he left us quite a legacy to enjoy for decades to come.
Rest in peace, Mr. Wilbur. And peace to the family you leave behind.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/…/cdb00a9c-b1db-11e7-be94-fa…

#PostMaria #SOS QUE FRUSTRACION, alguien me puede echar una mano en PR? hace casi 4 semanas compre x Amazonlamparas solares, pastillas purificadoras…

#PostMaria #SOS QUE FRUSTRACION, alguien me puede echar una mano en PR? hace casi 4 semanas compre x Amazonlamparas solares, pastillas purificadoras de agua y un radio de manivela para los abuelos de Una en Vega baja, Barrio Pugnado en la parte montañosa, ni siquiera ha sido enviado el paquete, otro paquete enviado por USPS hace 3 semanas nada, quiero hacerles llegar lamparas solares y pastillas purificadoras. Amigxs en Area Metro, estan recibiendo correo? puedo enviarle un paquete a alqyuien que pueda llevarlo a los viejos en Vega Baja?????

Was truly a great experience to speak at AdTech Tokyo

Was truly a great experience to speak at AdTech Tokyo. As a journalist, I don’t know much about the worlds of marketing and advertising, but we all have a common interest — in demanding that Facebook, Google and Twitter do more to combat fake news, fake advertising, online harassment and other toxic activities that undermine the credibility of the very medium in which they and we operate. You probably know Gresham’s Law of economics: Bad money drives out good money. Well, here’s my law: Bad information devalues good information. And when good information is devalued — we all lose.